Pillars of Data Governance Readiness: Enterprise Data Management Methodology

Pillars of Data Governance Readiness: Enterprise Data Management Methodology

Facebook’s data woes continue to dominate the headlines and further highlight the importance of having an enterprise-wide view of data assets. The high-profile case is somewhat different than other prominent data scandals as it wasn’t a “breach,” per se. But questions of negligence persist, and in all cases, data governance is an issue.

This week, the Wall Street Journal ran a story titled “Companies Should Beware Public’s Rising Anxiety Over Data.” It discusses an IBM poll of 10,000 consumers in which 78% of U.S. respondents say a company’s ability to keep their data private is extremely important, yet only 20% completely trust organizations they interact with to maintain data privacy. In fact, 60% indicate they’re more concerned about cybersecurity than a potential war.

The piece concludes with a clear lesson for CIOs: “they must make data governance and compliance with regulations such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR] an even greater priority, keeping track of data and making sure that the corporation has the ability to monitor its use, and should the need arise, delete it.”

With a more thorough data governance initiative and a better understanding of data assets, their lineage and useful shelf-life, and the privileges behind their access, Facebook likely could have gotten ahead of the problem and quelled it before it became an issue. Sometimes erasure is the best approach if the reward from keeping data onboard is outweighed by the risk.

But perhaps Facebook is lucky the issue arose when it did. Once the GDPR goes into effect, this type of data snare would make the company non-compliant, as the regulation requires direct consent from the data owner (as well as notification within 72 hours if there is an actual breach).

Considering GDPR, as well as the gargantuan PR fallout and governmental inquiries Facebook faced, companies can’t afford such data governance mistakes.

During the past few weeks, we’ve been exploring each of the five pillars of data governance readiness in detail and how they come together to provide a full view of an organization’s data assets. In this blog, we’ll look at enterprise data management methodology as the fourth key pillar.
Enterprise Data Management in Four Steps

Enterprise data management methodology addresses the need for data governance within the wider data management suite, with all components and solutions working together for maximum benefits.

A successful data governance initiative should both improve a business’ understanding of data lineage/history and install a working system of permissions to prevent access by the wrong people. On the flip side, successful data governance makes data more discoverable, with better context so the right people can make better use of it.

This is the nature of Data Governance 2.0 – helping organizations better understand their data assets and making them easier to manage and capitalize on – and it succeeds where Data Governance 1.0 stumbled.

Enterprise Data Management: So where do you start?

Metadata management provides the organization with the contextual information concerning its data assets. Without it, data governance essentially runs blind.

The value of metadata management is the ability to govern common and reference data used across the organization with cross-departmental standards and definitions, allowing data sharing and reuse, reducing data redundancy and storage, avoiding data errors due to incorrect choices or duplications, and supporting data quality and analytics capabilities.

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